Triangle Empowerment Center

Transgender Day of Resilience & Resistance 2015Tuesday November 17, 2015
7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

We shall gather at Durham Central Park (501 Foster St, Durham, NC 27701) at the covered pavilion at 7pm. Rev. Mykal Slack will lead us in word and song to remind us why we gather.

The “Ladies of the T” group at Triangle Empowerment Center will guide us in honoring and memorializing those who have succumbed to anti-transgender hatred and prejudice.

From there we will step off for a candle light vigil along Hunt Street to the LGBTQ Center of Durham (114 Hunt Street, Durham NC 27701). We will close out the evening with final words from Rev. Brendan Moore and light refreshments inside at the LGBTQ Center of Durham.

Let us show tribute to those we have lost and those who are lighting the way to increased acceptance and visibility for our transgender community.

This is a free community event.

Its Your World MSM Summit
Its Your World MSM Summit
Its Your World MSM Summit

Date: Thursday, April 16, 2015
Time: 9AM-5PM
Location: Hayti Heritage Center, 804 Old Fayetteville Street, Durham NC 27701

Free Parking is available at the Hayti Heritage Center, on Old Fayetteville Street behind Hayti, on Lakewood Avenue, on the side of Hayti, in the Shopping Center on Lakewood, and in the Phoenix Shopping Center across Fayetteville Street from Hayti.

All sessions will be (on average) 1 hour and 15 minutes, which includes 15 minutes for Q&A.

Hotel Accommodations

Register Now Pay Online

Topics/Sessions

Speakers and Panelists Ask a Summit Question in Private

Summit Agenda

Summit Purpose, Objective, and Goals

Session 1: "He Paid the Cost"
The purpose of this video and panel discussion is to galvanize support and increase awareness for faith based ministerial enterprises that attend to the spiritual needs of SGL men and women. Our primary endeavor is to positively highlight an ecumenical cross-section of gay affirming African-American male clergy invested in disseminating doctrinal content that services SGL communities with holistic, therapeutic, and restorative intent. Our goal is to bridge the often abysmal chasm that problematically divides spirituality and sexuality, erroneously rendering them mutually exclusive.

Session 2: It’s Your World
The desire to live authentically and in an environment free from discrimination is most certainly shared by all members of the LGBT community. Yet, the reality doing so greatly varies among us. For many individuals who are of the Transgender community, who are also minorities, authenticity requires the ability to self-determine one’s own gender identity and expression in order to live fully with dignity and respect. The Transgender community face difficulties meeting the basic needs (getting a job, housing, or health care) or having their gender identity respected (like simply going to a public restroom). Transgender Americans are experiencing a unique moment in history, as growing visibility leads to greater familiarity and understanding of Transgender lives. At the same time, many Transgender women of color still face enormous barriers to their safety, health and well being. In the 21st Century, you would not say “colored people”, but instead say “people of color”. So with that same line of thinking, you wouldn’t refer to the Transgender community as “Transgendered people”. Instead, you would say “people who are Transgendered” and give them the same respect.  Please join us for an open conversation and dialogue.

5 Transwomen and 1 Transgender male of color share their life stories of being a Transgender of color in the South. After a brief performance from the Transwomen, a Q&A session will follow.

Session 3: NC CAPUS Safe Spaces
CAPUS(Care and Prevention in the United States) “Safe Spaces” are venues or environments that are specifically designed for minority MSM/MSMW to get accurate health and medical information in a non-threatening and supportive atmosphere; and, unlike many EBIs/DEBIs, “Safe Spaces” are flexible in their design and can meet the convenience requirements of the minority and HIV positive community. “Safe Spaces” attendees will learn, be empowered and be given the tools to effectively work to overcome systemic and institutional social and structural barriers to health and care, and stigma.

It’s a place where MSM/MSMW who are newly diagnosed or have fallen out of care can go to learn various topics such as medication adherence and retention, HIV 101, Managing Anxiety and Depression, Stigma, Advocating for the best quality care and more. This is an environment where these men can learn more about their diagnose (i.e. what it means, how to take care of themselves, etc.) and learn to be better equipped to live the best possible healthy life with being HIV positive.

It is a place where Safe Spaces participants gather for education, sharing, support, fellowship, brotherhood, spiritual and emotional healing, and more. It’s a safe place where they can go to examine their issues, goals, strengths--and more-- in a supportive environment with other men, doing the exact same.

Safe Spaces Facilitators from various parts of North Carolina share their experiences, struggles and successes of being a Safe Spaces Facilitator and working with the young MSM who are HIV positive.

Session 4: Our Voices: Having and using my voice to address stigma & barriers
In communities of color, there is a need to address the sexual stigma against gay and bisexual men. The increase of HIV-related stigma and discrimination is closely linked to the prevalence of homophobia in communities of color. In the African-American community, for example, homosexuality is seen as a taboo subject that clashes with race, gender role expectations, definitions of masculinity, community norms relating to sexuality, and is perceived of as sinful and unnatural. For Latino gay men, homosexuality is thought to hurt or embarrass the family. Negative attitudes and beliefs about homosexuality often result in fear or reluctance among gay and bisexual men of color to identify as “gay” or to be “out” as a gay or bisexual person in their community.

The Black and Hispanic community and sexual minorities experience higher levels of race, sexual orientation, gender-based and HIV status-based institutionalized stigma compared to other groups. These experiences have an impact on access to health care and the quality of care individuals in these communities receive. This topic plans on addressing stigma and barriers to care for Black/African American and Hispanic MSM in the South. Join us for this open and honest conversation.

Session 5: PrEP in the South
PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis) is a new and emerging HIV prevention intervention in which HIV-negative individuals take an antiretroviral (ARV) to reduce their individual risk of acquiring HIV. Some of the highlights that will be covered during this session are: What is PrEP? How can I get help to pay for PrEP? Why take PrEP? and How do I speak to my doctor or other health care provider about PrEP? There will be a 4-5 member panel which will include dotors, providers and actual PrEP participants.

Films at the Summit

  • “Absolutely Positive”
    Local film director/producer Anthony Williams introduces the film and talks about its impact on the MSM community.
    More Info
  • “Purpose in the Pulpit”
    Pastor Dennis Massenberg reflects on the internal struggle he faced in reconciling his faith and his sexuality on the path to establishing his own church as a safe-haven for those in the African-American LBGTQ community. Carter McCall is a documentary photographer and filmmaker from Durham, NC. For the past several years, Carter has focused on sharing the complex personal narratives surrounding difference social issues including poverty, mental health, and sexuality.

Other information about the Summit

  • Free beverage break stations on each floor. Lunch will be provided.
  • TEC with community funders/supporters offer free scholarships to those in need.
  • HIV/STI testing at the summit (with incentives).
  • Photo area for pictures.
  • Lunch break will be an hour (30 minutes to eat and 30 to mingle).

Register Now Pay Online

For Vendors and Sponsors

Summit Sponsors

  • Space for vendors/organizations to set up tables on the 3rd floor. Vendor fee of $100.00 includes a table and 2 chairs plus admission and meals for one person at the Summit.
    Reserve a Table
  • For those who are interested in becoming a corporate sponsor, we are offering three levels: Silver $250 (includes 1/4 page ad in the program/booklet at summit), Gold $350 (includes a half page ad in program/booklet at summit) and Platinum $500 (includes a full page ad in our program/booklet at summit). All levels of sponsorship will also include your business name and logo listed as a sponsor/supporter on TEC’s website; inclusion in all radio public service announcements pertaining to the summit; inclusion in all press releases (pertaining to the summit); inclusion in all website, emails and social media postings regarding the summit (i.e. Facebook, Twitter, etc.); free registration for up to 3 people, free vendor table and lunch.
    Sponsorship Level

IDC Health & Wealth ExpoWe are providing the free HIV testing at the Infinity Diamond Club Health & Wealth Expo.

Join us April 11, 2015 from 10 am til 2 pm for the FREE We Are 1 Conference Health and Wealth Expo at Levin JCC, 1937 W Cornwallis Rd, Durham, NC 27705. Free Seminars, Health Screenings, Cooking Demos, Home Buyers information, Women and Technology (apps, networking and social media), Career Readiness and Job Transition, How to start your own Business, Financial Planning for your Future, Credit Repair Advice, and much more... If you are a vendor and would like to get information on how you can promote your business in the health, fitness, nutrition, financial, and or beauty fields contact Annie at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for details.

More Information on Facebook

Skate Party 2015 March 18

Over 80 people came, over 50 received a free HIV test. This event was awesome, and what made it better was the support of so many different organizations. Special shout to Durham County Department of Public Health for providing testing and to other supporters like TEC volunteers and Board Members, LGBTQ Center of Durham, HOLA Latino MPowerment Project, El Centro Hispano, the bold brothers of Kappa Psi Kappa Fraternity, Inc., AAS-C, the House of Versace, NCAAN and many more. I love it when a community comes together!!